Shelter Medicine Selectives

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Tufts Community Cat Clinics Structured Student Learning Program

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
Center for Animals and Public Policy
200 Westboro Rd
North Grafton, MA 01536
Contact:
Dr. Emily McCobb
E-mail:
emily.mccobb@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 839-3337
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
4
Credit:
varies
Semesters:
Fall, Spring
Description:

Opportunity to practice technical skills and procedures such as vaccinations, SQ fluid administration, etc. In addition, students will observe surgeries and feral cat clinic procedures. As a volunteer, students will be helping serve an animal population in need and support the shelter medicine program.

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Farm Sanctuary - NY

Farm Sanctuary - NY
PO Box 150
Watkins Glen, NY 14891
Contact:
unknown
Phone:
(607) 583-2225
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
varies
Credit:
0.5
Semesters:
Summer
Description:

Summer selective option, 0.5 credit only. Farm Sanctuary is a non-profit farm animal protection organization. All interns are responsible for a specific job for 40 hours/week, shelter emergencies as needed, special educational opportunities. Minimum commitment is one month.

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Foster Parrots Adoption Ltd.

Foster Parrots Adoption Ltd.
PO Box 650
Rockland, MA 02370
Contact:
Mark Johnson
E-mail:
marc@fosterparrots.com
Phone:
(508) 577-0111
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
2
Credit:
varies
Semesters:
Fall, Spring, Summer
Description:

A nonprofit parrot rescue and a public charity dedicated to serving unwanted or neglected parrots.

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Worcester Animal Rescue League

Worcester Animal Rescue League
Center for Animals and Public Policy
139 Holden St
Worcester, MA 01606
Contact:
Dr. Emily McCobb
E-mail:
emily.mccobb@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 887-4745 x84570
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
2
Credit:
varies
Semesters:
Fall, Spring, Summer
Description:

Students taking this selective will have the opportunity to investigate the inner working of an urban shelter that does both private humane society work, and serves as an animal control facility for the city of Worcester and several surrounding communities.

The benefit of this type of shelter is that is provides you with the opportunity to see the differences between animals that are owner relinquishments, and those that are picked up as strays by an animal control officer. Adoptions and the entire adoption process can also be observed. You may have the opportunity to see animals at the shelter that are part of an animal cruelty investigation

Participation in this selective will give you an opportunity to observe the flow of animals through the shelter, from adoption to intake processing, to behavioral evaluations of dogs, to life on the adoption floor, and finally to adoption. You will be allowed to participate in the medical care of the animal on intake (perform physical exams, and do routine lab work). Depending on when you are taking the selective, you may be able to assist veterinarians in the spaying and neutering of animals.

This selective can either be taken during the semester (on Tuesday afternoons, or Wednesday mornings), or during the summer.

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The Study of Animal Welfare

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
Center for Animals and Public Policy
200 Westboro Rd
North Grafton, MA 01536
Contact:
Dr. Emily McCobb
E-mail:
emily.mccobb@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 887-4570 x84570
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
varies
Credit:
0.5
Semesters:
Spring
Description:

Spring – 2014 this course will be taught on Tuesday afternoons from 2 to 4 pm. However, students should reserve the 1 to 5 pm slot because there will be some field trips and some sessions will include time for completing reading assignments and group work. The first class will be held on Tuesday February 4. This course is co-offered to Masters of Animals in Public Policy students.

Students interested in the Shelter Medicine Program should take this course in the first year. However, it is open to all first and second year students. This course will explore a range of subjects related to animal welfare. The goal is for the student to understand various perspectives and definitions of animal welfare, methods for scientific study and evaluation of animal welfare, the effect of policy and markets on shaping of practices, and current welfare issues in areas such as animal agriculture, sport, science, and education. The course will review the history of animal welfare and the evolution of legislation and policy in the US and elsewhere. To follow, we will consider various aspects of assessing welfare, including stress, physical health, mental states, and quality of life. Issues such as selective breeding, environmental conditions, transportation, humane killing, and animals as business opportunities will be discussed with a cross-species approach. Finally, the students will be introduced to methods of conducting welfare assessments. The format of the course will include a blend of readings, lectures, practical experience, discussion, and student projects.

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Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic

Worcester Vocational High School
Community Veterinary Clinic
1 Skyline Drive
Worcester, MA 01605
Contact:
Katie Baker
E-mail:
Kathryn.baker@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 751-7670
Categories:
Community Medicine, Shelter Medicine, Small Animal Practice
Students:
4
Credit:
varies
Semesters:
Fall, Spring, Summer
Description:

Semesters: Fall & Spring – 3 students/semester – Selection is by selective lottery process

Summer Semester: Students must contact Katie Baker via email at kathryn.baker@tufts.edu to arrange their schedule. Summer Semester is not part of the Lottery process – signing up with Katie is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Description:
Students taking this selective will have the opportunity to participate in the function of a student run, primary care veterinary hospital directed to servicing a low income pet population in the Greater Worcester Area.
Selective students will be expected to assist at all levels of a functioning animal clinic, including, but not limited to general reception skills, client education/communication, technical assistant to fourth year veterinary students, anesthetic assistant, surgical assistant, general housekeeping and hospitality. Due to the unique environment and low cost clinic model, this will be an opportunity to for students to learn how to incorporate community service with a passion for veterinary medicine.

Requirements: Any student who enters the Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic will be required to provide a photocopy of their Mass ID (and/or passport or other state ID) and MUST complete a CORI FORM. A copy of the form can be found under “forms” in the Selective Guide. All students are required to print and complete the CORI form and provide a photocopy ID and MUST Mail to Kyle Brenner 3 weeks prior to entering the clinic. If documentation is not received and/or approved prior to the start of the selective, you will not be permitted on the Worcester Technical High School campus and will receive a failing grade for this experience. NO exceptions will be granted regarding the CORI Form requirement.

Please MAIL your completed CORI FORM and ID TO:
Kyle J. Brenner
Director – Career and Technical Education
Worcester Public Schools
Worcester Technical High School
1 Skyline Drive
Worcester, MA 01605
Further questions should be directed to Dr. Wolfus via email or phone (508) 751-7670

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Shelter Medicine

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
Center for Animals and Public Policy
200 Westboro Rd
North Grafton, MA 01536
Contact:
Dr. Emily McCobb
E-mail:
emily.mccobb@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 887-4570
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
varies
Credit:
0.5
Semesters:
Fall
Description:

Offered in the Fall for 2nd Year Students

The shelter medicine selective course is an intensive course focusing on applied small animal medicine in the shelter setting. The format is readings, lectures and group discussion. The course will involve ten course sessions as well as some out of class preparation time.

Possible Course Topics:

  • Shelter Medicine 101: Overview and opportunities in shelter medicine
  • Concepts of Herd Health and epidemiology in shelters
  • Feline URI/Other infectious disease
  • Emergency care and triage in a shelter setting
  • Diagnostics and pathology in the shelter
  • Vaccination in shelters and foster homes
  • Sanitations standards in shelter settings
  • Transport issues and health
  • Zoonotic disease concerns/immunocompromised humans
  • Public health regulations and reportable disease
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Introduction to Veterinary Forensics

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
200 Westboro Rd
North Grafton, MA 01536
Contact:
Dr. Emily McCobb
E-mail:
emily.mccobb@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 887-4570
Categories:
Shelter Medicine
Students:
varies
Credit:
0.5
Semesters:
Fall
Description:

Students: Third year veterinary students with a strong interest in Shelter Medicine

This course will be taught by Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, acting director of the Animal Rescue League of Boston and past president of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians. Dr. McCobb will be the course coordinator. The course will be targeted to third year veterinary students and taught at a basic level. The format will be 20 hours of lecture and discussion in addition to assigned readings and projects. Topics covered will include the animal cruelty laws in the US, the basic structure and time line of a criminal investigation and trial, documentation of evidence at the scene, how to conduct a forensic necropsy and preserve the chain of evidence. In addition the pathology of non-accidental injury and neglect will be covered in various species. Sessions will be devoted towards interactions of the veterinarian with law enforcement, animal inspectors and pet owners as well as with legal professionals.
Required Text: Merck, M. Veterinary Forensics, animal cruelty investigations. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2007.

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Shelter Visits

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
200 Westboro Rd
North Grafton, MA 01536
Contact:
Dr. Emily McCobb
E-mail:
emily.mccobb@tufts.edu
Phone:
(508) 839-4570 x84570
Categories:
Animals and Public Policy, Shelter Medicine
Students:
varies
Credit:
0.5
Semesters:
Fall, Spring
Description:

This selective is designed for students with a special interest in shelter medicine. The sessions will be divided as follows:
Session 1: (2 hours) meet with Dr. McCobb to discuss semester goals and prepare list of locations to visit. The selected locations can be determined by the student’s interests and by ease of travel. In addition, we will review a list of goals/questions to be answered by the student at each visit site.

Sessions 2-9 (4 hours each) The student will visit up to 8 different animal shelters around the region. For each shelter the student will complete a one page visit assessment sheet.

Session 10: (2 hours) the student will meet with Dr. McCobb again to discuss the shelter visits and what was learned.